6 Mortgage Terms to Know

mortgage-new-jerseyBuying a house is an exciting and busy time. Once you’re pre-approved for a mortgage, you can start looking at homes in your price range. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or have been there before, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Not only will you have to find a home inspector and a real estate lawyer, you’ll also need to choose a mortgage lender. A mortgage represents a serious amount of money, so it’s important to fully understand it.

Before diving into these key mortgage terms we think it is important to briefly describe the difference between a Mortgage Broker and a Mortgage Lender.  A Mortgage Broker is an intermediary who brings mortgage borrowers and mortgage lenders together, but does not use its own funds to originate mortgages. A mortgage broker gathers paperwork from a borrower, and passes that paperwork along to a mortgage lender for underwriting and approval.

Here are 6 mortgage terms to know as a homebuyer:

1. Amortization Period
Do you aspire to be mortgage-free? Well, you’ll want to know your amortization period. Your amortization period is the period of time over which your mortgage will be fully paid off. Generally, a standard amortization period on high-ratio mortgages (a down payment between 5% and 19.99%) is 25 years. On conventional mortgages (a down payment 20% or greater), 30 year amortization periods are still available. By shortening your amortization period you’ll pay less interest over the life of your mortgage, but your mortgage payments will be higher. A few years ago homeowners could choose an amortization period as long as 40 years, but that has recently been reduced by the federal government in an effort to avoid a housing bubble.

2. Appraisal
Even though you may of have purchased your home for $550,000, it doesn’t necessarily mean your lender agrees with its value. Most mortgage lenders will require an appraisal to determine your property’s value. You shouldn’t confuse market value and appraised value, as they aren’t always the same. It’s important to not get caught up in a bidding war and pay a lot more than the appraisal value, as you’ll have to come up with the extra money if the appraisal comes in a lot less. Homebuyers cover the cost of appraisals, although some lenders may be willing to foot the bill.

RELATED: Market Value vs. Appraised Value

3. Home Insurance
Protects your home in most cases from fire and other named perils. Insurance is paid by monthly premiums. Most lenders require you’re fully insured before they’ll approve your mortgage.

RELATED: 12 Ways to Save Money On Home Insurance

4. Interest
Lenders don’t simply offer you a mortgage out of the goodness of their heart. The interest on a loan like a mortgage covers the cost of borrowing. When you start paying your mortgage, you’ll notice your interest payments are quite high, but as you get closer to paying it off your interest payments will get smaller. That’s because as you pay down your principal, your interest payments become less and less.

RELATED: Four Areas of Financial Wellness That Mortgage Lenders Love

5. Principal
Nobody wants to pay only the interest on their mortgage. A portion of each mortgage payments goes towards principal and interest. Most closed mortgages come with prepayments privileges. When you make lump sum payments, it’s applied against principal. This can help you shave years off your mortgage and save thousands in interest.

RELATED: Will I Qualify For A Mortgage?

6. Term
Not to be confused with the amortization period, a mortgage term is the length of your current mortgage agreement. Although a mortgage term can be as short as six months or as long as 10 years, most homebuyers choose the stability of a five-year fixed rate mortgage term. Once your mortgage term expires, you can repay your balance in full or renew your mortgage with the same or another mortgage lender.