Red Cross Ready Checklist for each Member of Your Family

safety-plan-childrenChildren
During a disaster, your family may have to leave your home and depart from your daily routine. Children may become anxious, confused, or frightened. It is important to give children guidance that will help them reduce their fears.

Children depend on daily routines. They wake up, eat breakfast, go to school, play with friends. When emergencies or disasters interrupt this routine, many children may become anxious.

In a disaster, they’ll look to you and other adults for help. How you react to an emergency gives them clues on how to act. If you react with alarm, your child may become more scared. They see your fear as proof that the danger is real. If you seem overcome with a sense of loss, your child may feel their losses more strongly.

Children’s fears may also arise from their imagination, and you should take these feelings seriously. A child who feels afraid is afraid. Your words and actions can provide reassurance. When talking with your child, be sure to present a realistic picture that is both honest and manageable.

Feelings of fear are healthy and natural for both adults and children. But as an adult, you need to keep control of the situation. When you’re sure that danger has passed, concentrate on your child’s emotional needs by asking the child what’s uppermost in his or her mind. Having children participate in the family’s recovery activities will help them feel that their life will soon return to “normal.” Your response during this time may have a lasting impact.

Seniors
Senior citizens should create a personal support network made up of several individuals who will check in on them in an emergency, to ensure their wellness and to give assistance if needed. This personal support network, ideally made up of 3 individuals, can consist of friends, roommates, family members, relatives, personal attendants, co-workers and neighbors.

There are seven important items to discuss and implement with a personal support network:

  • Make arrangements, prior to an emergency, for your support network to immediately check on you after a disaster and, if needed, offer assistance.
  • Exchange important keys.
  • Show them where you keep emergency supplies.
  • Share copies of your relevant emergency documents, evacuation plans and emergency health information card.
  • Agree on and practice methods for contacting each other in an emergency. Do not count on the telephones working.
  • You and your personal support network should always notify each other when you are going out of town and when you will return.
  • The relationship should be mutual. You have a lot to contribute! Learn about each other’s needs and how to help each other in an emergency. You might take responsibility for food supplies and preparation, organizing neighborhood watch meetings and interpreting, among other things.

A great tool to help prepare an aging loved one for an emergency, is the Preparedness Guide for Seniors by Seniors offered as a free download by the Red Cross.

And, Knowing that you can’t always be there when a loved one might need you, the Red Cross is proud to offer Lifeline. The Lifeline service allows people to get access to fast help, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year with the push of a button. Learn more Lifeline from Red Cross.

People with Disabilities
Emergencies can happen at a moment’s notice. Mobility problems and hearing, learning, or seeing disabilities can add complication. It is important to plan ahead so you are better prepared for any urgent situation.

If this is relevant in your life, we encourage you to download the Red Cross booklet; Preparing for Disaster for People with Disabilities and other Special Needs. You’ll find tips on getting informed, making a plan, assembling a kit, and keeping your plans up to date.

Pets
In the event of a disaster, if you must evacuate, the most important thing you can do to protect your pets is to evacuate them too. If it’s not safe for you to stay behind then it’s not safe to leave pets behind either. Take action now so you know how to best care for your furry friends when the unexpected occurs.

pet-safety-catKnow a Safe Place to Take Your Pets:

  • Local and state health and safety regulations do not permit the Red Cross to allow pets in disaster shelters. (Service animals are allowed in Red Cross shelters.)
  • Contact hotels and motels outside your local area to check their policies on accepting pets and restrictions on number, size and species. Ask if “no pet” policies can be waived in an emergency. Keep a list of “pet friendly” places, including phone numbers, with your disaster supplies.
  • Ask friends, relatives or others outside the affected area whether they could shelter your animals.
  • Make a list of boarding facilities and veterinarians who could shelter animals in an emergency; include 24-hour phone numbers.
  • Ask local animal shelters if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets during a disaster.

Assemble a Pet Emergency Preparedness Kit:

Keep your pet’s essential supplies in sturdy containers that can be easily accessed and carried (a duffle bag or covered trash containers, for example). Your pet emergency preparedness kit should include:

  • Medications and medical records (stored in a waterproof container) and a First Aid kit.
  • Sturdy leashes, harnesses, and/or carriers to transport pets safely and ensure that your animals can’t escape.
  • Current photos of your pets in case they get lost.
  • Food, drinkable water, bowls, cat litter/pan, and manual can opener.
  • Information on feeding schedules, medical conditions, behavior problems, and the name and number of your veterinarian in case you have to foster or board your pets.
  • Pet bed or toys if easily transportable.

Help Emergency Workers Help Your Pets
The ASPCA recommends using a rescue sticker alert to let people know that pets are inside your home. Make sure it is visible to rescue workers, and that it includes the types and number of pets in your household and your veterinarian’s phone number.

If you must evacuate with you pets (and if time allows) write “EVACUATED” across the stickers so rescue workers don’t waste time looking for them.

Get an ASPCA Rescue Sticker

Download Great First Aid and Emergency Preparedness Apps offered by The American Red Cross.

Stay safe, we hope you never need this advice.